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MIFGASHIM  March 2003

MIFGASHIM March 2003

Subject:

MIFGASHIM

From:

Solly Kaplinski <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

MIFGASHIM LIST <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 2 Mar 2003 23:42:41 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (284 lines)

MIFGASHIM

March 2 2003
28 Adar 1, Volume 2:26
Moderator: Solly Kaplinski
The Lookstein Center for Jewish Education
Bar Ilan University

-----------------------------------------------------------

CONTENTS

1. Resource of the Week.
Esther Feldman: Director, Information and Technology Services
The Lookstein Center

2. Focus on Current Events and Parashat Hashavuah
Chana German, Co-ordinator, Virtual Resource Center
The Lookstein Center

3. Jerusalem calling
Paul Liptz
Jewish Agency, Jerusalem

4. The Role of Heroes in Jewish Education
Shlomo Kaye
(See MIFGASHIM February 3 and 24 2003)

5. How should Jewish educators deal with Emma Goldman?  Do her ceaseless
attempts to better the world make her a useful illustration of tikkun olam
and worthy of inclusion in a unit on Jewish heroes?
Jennifer Sartori: Program Director Jewish Women's Archive www.jwa.org

6. Outcomes Based Education and the Hebrew Language Curriculum – help
required!
Responses to Martine Kruss (See MIFGASHIM February 24 03)
6.1 Judy Groner: Judaic Studies Director B'nai Shalom Day School,
Greensboro, North Carolina

6.2 Dr. Dania Shapira, Boston.

-----------------------------------------------------------

CONTENTS

1. Resource of the Week
Esther Feldman: Director, Information and Technology Services
The Lookstein Center

This week's resource:

A provocative article from Education Week

"The Virtual Schoolhouse" discusses the development of online learning for
kindergarten through 12th grade. Usually I don't ask for any feedback to
the 'resource of the week', but in this case, I'd be very interested in
hearing comments and thoughts about this article.

To see this week's resource go to

http://www.lookstein.org/resource_week/march2003.htm

or to

http://www.lookstein.org/resource_week.htm and click on March 2003

-----------------------------------------------------------

2. Focus on Current Events and Parashat Hashavuah
Chana German, Co-ordinator, Virtual Resource Center
The Lookstein Center

Each week the Lookstein Center offers educators discussion points to focus
on in the classroom for both the weekly Torah portion and current events in
Israel. These resources can be accessed at

http://www.lookstein.org/edu_focus_on.htm

This week: Focus on Current Events asks:

Can someone separate their religious convictions from their political
activity?

Focus on Parashat HaShavuah (Pekudei) considers the appointment of the
Kohanim, in which Aharon played no active role. Would you want your leaders
to be able to promote themselves actively, or people whom others wanted to
promote?

"And thou shall put upon Aharon the holy garments, and anoint him, and
sanctify him, that he may minister to me in the priest's office. And thou
shall bring him sons, and clothe them with coats."
Shemot 40: 12-14

-----------------------------------------------------------
3. Jerusalem calling
Paul Liptz: Jewish Agency, Jerusalem


If you are interested in a new on-line 10-part program (in real time) that
I am giving, please click for the website

www.akt.co.il/AMBASSADOR/Temp/Jerusalem_Calling/

-----------------------------------------------------------

4. The Role of Heroes in Jewish Education
Shlomo Kaye
(See MIFGASHIM February 3 and 24 2003)


In last week’s MIFGASHIM, an interesting comment was made about the
definition of heroes: “In an age where there are not too many perceived
heroes around, perhaps we need to be careful not to overlook the everyday
acts of meaningful ordinariness which while performed on a small scale,
collectively, add up to something truly heroic.”

It got me thinking about what the real essentials are in life, that when
all is said and done, how we are ultimately judged and remembered is not
whether we put our minds in the way of great things, but rather our concern
for everydayness and how we managed the commonplace; not for whether
we "did it" in style or in a blaze of glory, but whether we were
unassuming, unheroic and inconspicuously pious. In the final analysis, the
finished portrait of ourselves should be admired not for its beautifully
ornamented and painstakingly crafted frame but for the care, concern and
sense of loyalty and fairplay we enacted on behalf of others.

I guess what I am saying is that the real heroes are those who fulfil
simple basic mitzvot, good deeds, acts of kindness which don’t
necessarily “make the news” but which in and of themselves, go a long way
to serve the common good. So my questions to colleagues are:

How do you go about inculcating in your students

the value of service to others?

the importance of helping those in need?

doing something for others that will not necessarily put you in the
spotlight?

an understanding that being there for someone and for no altruistic reason
or reward whatsoever is simply the right thing to do?

 -----------------------------------------------------------

5. How should Jewish educators deal with Emma Goldman?  Do her ceaseless
attempts to better the world make her a useful illustration of tikkun olam
and worthy of inclusion in a unit on Jewish heroes?

Jennifer Sartori: Program Director Jewish Women's Archive www.jwa.org

Over the past year and a half, the political climate in the United States –
and elsewhere in the world – has left little room for dissent.  The U.S.
administration’s rhetoric has implied that any disagreement with its
policies is unpatriotic, and the ability of immigrants and resident aliens
to express themselves freely has been constrained by fears of jeopardizing
their position in the US.

In this context, the life and work of Emma Goldman (1869-1940) can serve as
useful entry points for classroom discussions.  A century ago, Goldman
faced many of the same problems immigrants and opponents of government
policies face today.  Government authorities and private vigilante groups
attempted to prevent her from expressing her radical views on anarchism,
workers’ rights, women’s rights, and free speech.  Ultimately, her
controversial stances led to the invalidation of her citizenship and her
deportation from the United States in 1919.  Through Goldman’s experiences,
students not only learn that today’s problems have deep roots, they can
also begin to clarify their own positions on important current issues.
High school students, many of whom are struggling to define their own
relationships to authority, often find Goldman particularly thought-
provoking.

The Jewish Women’s Archive, in collaboration with the Emma Goldman Papers
Project, recently launched a new on-line exhibit on Goldman, available at
http://www.jwa.org/exhibits/goldman/.  We believe that Goldman’s
experiences have a great deal to teach us today, and that young people can
take inspiration from her courage in fighting for unpopular causes
regardless of whether they agree or disagree with her beliefs.

Even today, Goldman is a highly controversial figure.  On January 14, 2003,
the New York Times published a front-page article about a dispute between
the Emma Goldman Papers Project and the administration of the University of
California-Berkeley (where the Project is housed).  Berkeley officials
refused to allow the Project to mail a fund-raising letter because it
contained quotes from Goldman about the suppression of free speech and
Goldman’s opposition to war.

The Jewish community has its own reasons for finding Goldman a problematic
figure.  Goldman’s hostility to organized religion – including Judaism – is
well known, and her anarchist opposition to the state led naturally to her
opposition to Zionism.  At the same time, Goldman’s beliefs emerged in part
from a Jewish tradition that championed universal justice, and she
understood that her own ideals had their roots in a Jewish historical
experience shaped by longstanding oppression.  She is an important figure
in the history of Jewish activism in the United States, and she had a large
following within the Jewish immigrant community.

How, then, should Jewish educators deal with Emma Goldman?  Do her
ceaseless attempts to better the world make her a useful illustration of
tikkun olam and worthy of inclusion in a unit on Jewish heroes?  How can we
best present her to students in all her complexity?  I would like to hear
list-members’ opinions on this subject.  If you have taught about Goldman,
what were your experiences?  If you haven’t, why not?

-----------------------------------------------------------

6. Outcomes Based Education and the Hebrew Language Curriculum - help
required!
Responses to Martine Kruss
(See MIFGASHIM February 24 03)

6.1 Judy Groner: Judaic Studies Director
B'nai Shalom Day School, Greensboro, North Carolina


You might want to investigate the NETA program, a new experimental Hebrew
language program for middle and high school grades. The materials are
interesting, colorful and up-to-date; modern Israel poetry and song lyrics
are incorporated into short booklets. NETA provides training and follow-up
for teachers in its program. Contact Debbie Cohen in Boston at
617-559-8665 or [log in to unmask]

 ----------------------------

6. 2 Dr. Dania Shapira, Boston.

First of all, I am glad that you have "adopted" my motto, "learning with
joy." However, this goes both ways: "teaching with joy" too. Unfortunately,
many of the teachers who teach Hebrew are not doing it by choice (usually,
if one teaches Hebrew literature in Israel, one has to teach Hebrew
languages as well).

In order to pass on the joy of learning, the teacher should be enthusiastic
about what he/she is teaching. You can use "old" texts and encourage your
students to come up (in Hebrew) with ideas of analogy to current events;
you can use Devorah Omer's (to name one author) books for youth, many of
them about the history of Israel and the Jewish people; you could rewrite
chapters, or just paragraphs and discuss them - once again, in relation to
current events and to heroes like Hannah Senesh, also learning her
poem/song "Eli, Eli” and letting  the students elaborate or giving their
own opinions.

In recent years there has been a trend to avoid grammatical issues. I
believe that grammar is of the utmost importance for the knowledge of how
to pronounce and use words correctly, separately and within a sentence, how
to put together a sentence, a paragraph, etc. It's boring to teach/study in
a systematic way only (although now and then it's important to do that
too!).

The best way to teach/learn grammar is "by-the-way" - while talking,
reading, watching a video you come across issues related to the structure
of verbs, including their various shapes in different Binyanim and
Mishkalim, and as a result, the change in their content and how the same
root is similar/different in verbs, nouns, adjectives and adverbs. You can
use text from newspapers ("Sha'ar Lamatchil" is supposed to be easy, but I
found it quite advanced). Bad text(unfortunately, both books and newspapers
nowadays contain plenty of mistakes) is also good ifyou want to work on
grammatical issues. And the list is long. If you are willing to invest
time and creativity, both you and your students will benefit. Good luck!

-----------------------------------------------------------

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

The Mifgashim List is a project of
The Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein Center for Jewish Education in the Diaspora
The School of Education, Bar Ilan University

To leave the list, respond to this message with the word "remove" in the
subject line.
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You can search the archives at
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Check out online educational materials and information on other
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The website is supported, in part, by a generous grant from the
AviChai Foundation.

Further information may be obtained by writing to: [log in to unmask]

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