LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for MIFGASHIM Archives


MIFGASHIM Archives

MIFGASHIM Archives


MIFGASHIM@LISTSERV.BIU.AC.IL


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MIFGASHIM Home

MIFGASHIM Home

MIFGASHIM  January 2009

MIFGASHIM January 2009

Subject:

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 38

From:

Lee Buckman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Mon, 19 Jan 2009 16:09:28 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (301 lines)

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 38


Contents:

1.	Announcements:  Lookstein Podcast

2.	Responses:  
a.	Impact of Ben Gamla Schools on Jewish Day Schools (Kutler)
b.	Alumni Campaigns in K-8 Schools (Scheindlin, Levi, Erani, Shtull, Rogozen)


3.	Marshall Memo:  Learning to Read in Kindergarten


~~~~~~~~~


1.	Announcements:  Lookstein Podcast

This week, Classroom Teaching looks at the relationship between Judaism and thinking 
skills. Are we required to teach our students higher level thinking skills?
 
To hear or subscribe to the podcast, go to http://www.lookstein.org/podcasts/


~~~~~~~~~


2a.	Responses:  Impact of Ben Gamla Schools on Jewish Day Schools (Kutler)

In 2006, Peter Deutch approached the Jewish Day Schools of Broward County Fl with the 
notion of a joint venture called the Ben Gamla Charter School.  He met with me and my 
lay leaders separately from the other day schools in order to propose a venture in a 
Charter School whereby the day schools would lend their facilities and staff for the social 
studies and Hebrew curricula. 

At the meeting Peter outlined his vision for Jewish education that included a Judaic social 
studies element and informed us that G-d would be left out of the courses of study.  Since 
we, collectively, did not want to change our mission to the Jewish community we 
demurred and did not accept his offer of a joint venture.  

We asked Peter if he would entertain a conversation regarding the Hebrew curriculum and 
the Judaic social studies program with the Broward Board of Education present, but he 
demurred. 

The basic issue for us was transparency.  An approved curriculum was submitted on 
September 1, 2006 to the Board of Education, but nowhere was there a specific outline of 
the course of study for the Judaic social studies unit.

The following statement exists:  “The school's regular curriculum will be enhanced by the 
Hebrew Cultural Curriculum taught in Hebrew as well as the teaching of the Hebrew 
language.  Through the curricular emphasis on cultural/social studies and the exposure of 
Hebrew language, the students will receive a world-class education and an excellent 
preparation for an advanced level high school curriculum."

The issue of transparency became an important one for the Broward community. How 
was the social studies curriculum to be taught?  What was it? What materials would be 
utilized (NETA was proposed for the middle school)?

The issue of teaching Hebrew as a second language in a public school was never a salient 
one for the community since Hebrew language instruction in American public schools has 
a long and cherished history.  The issue for Broward County was the Judaic social studies 
course and its methodology and delivery. 

At first, there was a loss of registration in some of the Day Schools from a segment of 
the population who valued Hebrew language acquisition more importantly than cultural, 
spiritual, and Judaic transmission. Also the perceived value of a private school and its 
investment in its students minimized the enrollment impact on the Jewish Day Schools. 

The competition for the Jewish Day Schools remain the other independent private schools 
and not primarily Ben Gamla.

Dr. Laurence Kutler
Head of School
David Posnack Hebrew Day School,
Plantation Fl
[log in to unmask]


~~~~~~~~~


2b.	Responses: Alumni Campaigns in K-8 Schools (Scheindlin, Levi, Erani, Shtull, 
Rogozen)


I remember reading a while ago on, I believe, the NAIS website that it's much more 
difficult for elementary schools to get contributions from alumni than for high schools and 
colleges. However, I've got a feeling that being a Jewish day school gives us a leg up.  

It's only in the last couple of years that we've started to tackle alumni, so I can't speak 
from enormous success here (yet), but the response we've gotten suggests to me that 
many alumni have a special place in their heart for the school that got them started not 
only in academics but also in their Jewish identity.
 
I don't know of a Jewish day school that does a great job with alumni (that doesn't mean 
there aren't).  

What we've done to date:

•	We put together a database that includes just about all of our graduates, the 
majority with updated address information.

•	We send our newsletter (which comes out 3-4 times a year) to them. The 
newsletter includes a page with profiles of 2-3 alumni.
•	We invite alumni from the previous 5-7 years to attend graduation, and hold a 
special event for them.
•	We now have an alumni council (as of this year) that is beginning to organize 
events by graduation year (there have been occasional such, but they're trying to be 
more organized about it), and, we hope, will also come up with other ways to maintain a 
connection and solicit funds.

The above efforts have resulted already in small but meaningful, and, more important, 
promising contributions.
 
Hope the above is somewhat helpful.

Rabbi Larry Scheindlin 
Head of School
Sinai-Akiba Day School
Los Angeles, CA
[log in to unmask]


~~~~~~~~~


It is indeed harder to raise money from graduates of K-8 schools than from high schools.  
The data I’ve seen on this has been from the NAIS world.  

The reasons suggested have focused on the fact that high school experiences are closer 
to the adult experiences than the elementary school ones are.  I would also add that high 
schools tend to do more about active alumni activities.  
 
We are just reaching the stage where we are actively soliciting alumni.  Our oldest alumni 
are still under 30.  The first step was to create an alumni association.  We’ve had several 
alumni reunions.  We now have an alumni publication and a Facebook group.  

Now, in observance of our 25th anniversary, we’re doing a project in which current 
students honor alumni by class clusters—thus bringing alumni in for Kabbalat Shabbat.  
For the first time, we’re actively inviting alumni of high school age and above to our 
Benefit (reduced prices for the younger alumni).  

As you can see, this is a long process—both of keeping alumni engaged especially through 
those high school and college years and of waiting until they are old enough to actually 
contribute meaningfully.  Many of us lost touch with alumni during years when we were 
smaller schools and weren’t ramped up to maintain databases.  A key to our growing 
program has been an alum who works in our office and who has given many hours to 
updating our data base and contacting alumni—as an alum, using Facebook and 
contemporary communication modes.  
 
Dr. Ray Levi
Head of School
Minneapolis Jewish Day School
[log in to unmask]


~~~~~~~~~


We have no organized experience with this area yet.  Our eldest graduates are in grade 
11. 

We have gotten continued contributions from alumni parents, who felt and feel a 
connection to the school. Most of these are founding families. 

We invite the alumni parents to our annual dinner and the alumni as well (kids at cost) in 
order to keep the connection to the school fresh. Looking forward to reading ideas others 
have to consider implementing in the future.

Amy Erani
Director of Judaic Studies
Westchester Fairfield Hebrew Academy
270 Lake Avenue • Greenwich, CT 06830
203-863-9663 x 505
[log in to unmask]
203-863-9663 x505


~~~~~~~~~


I don’t think it’s harder to raise money from K-8 alumni.  It just requires the same 
amount of work that any outreach or campaign requires -- a lot of communication, 
parental (lay) involvement, and staff time dedicated to working on it.  

I believe that anything is possible – with the right kind of outreach, effort, and funds. 

The challenge is that schools often don’t have those necessary resources (staff time and 
funding) to do the outreach that is required.  That is where we fall short.  

Dina Shtull
Head of School
Hebrew Day School of Ann Arbor
[log in to unmask]


~~~~~~~~~


Not much to report. We’re just starting…our oldest alumni are around 30 years old and 
most are out of town. We’ve done some Facebook stuff, an alumni basketball game, etc. 
but have just begun to get some Annual Fund gifts. We are very excited, however, that 
we now have alumni as parents and staff members!!
 
My guess is that we would be more likely to get more donations from alumni if we were a 
high school. Not so much because the students would have been part of the decision 
where to go to school, but that people tend to see their last educational venues as having 
contributed more to their success. 

They don’t connect the dots and understand that their success in high school and beyond 
is due, in part, to their elementary education.
 
Rabbi Jim Rogozen
Head of School
Gross Schechter
Pepper Pike, OH
[log in to unmask]


~~~~~~~~~


3.	Marshall Memo:  Learning to Read in Kindergarten

The prevailing assumption has been that a formal reading curriculum is inappropriate for 
kindergartners. But teachers and district staff in Northern Lights, Alberta taught virtually 
all their kindergarten students to read – and they conducted an action research project to 
document the key elements of their program.

The Canadian educators started with a strong value position: “Building greater literacy is 
a matter of considerable importance, and not damaging our students is of even greater 
importance.” They also believed that “Not to challenge students cognitively might be an 
even larger mistake than challenging them.” So they proceeded carefully, tracking 
children’s responses, and were prepared to back off or change their approach if a student 
appeared to be stressed. 

Another driving belief was that “learning to read should be a delightful experience… If the 
work of childhood is play, we imagined the students playfully working their way into 
literacy.” 

So there were no workbooks, alphabet flash cards, and letter-by-letter phonics drills. 
Instead, students read words, sentences, and longer texts that they had created, 
examined simple books in a relaxed atmosphere, and began to write with scribbling and 
simple illustrations; students were read to regularly, and comprehension strategies were 
modeled for them through the reading and study of charming fiction and nonfiction books. 

Gleaned from extensive research, these were the foundations of the Northern Lights 
program:
-	The development of sight vocabulary from the students’ listening/speaking 
vocabulary and the study of words encountered through reading;
-	Wide reading at the developed level;
-	The regular study of word patterns, including spelling;
-	Regular (several times daily) writing and the study of writing;
-	The study of comprehension strategies;
-	The study, by both teacher and students, of weekly and monthly progress, including 
the levels of books the students could read, sight words learned, phonetic and structural 
analysis skills, information learned, and fluency in writing.

Students progressed well through the program, moving from recognition of letters of the 
alphabet to acquisition of sight vocabulary to retention of words to classification of words 
to reading books of increasing levels of complexity. 

Students and parents were surveyed in May on how things were going, and virtually all 
felt good about the process (although a few parents wondered if a more phonics-based 
approach might have worked even better). 

By the end of the year, virtually all the students knew how to read, and a follow-up study 
a year later found that the student average reading level was 5.0 (typical exit level for 
fourth graders), with only 10% of students scoring below the average for exiting second 
graders. 

“Learning to Read in Kindergarten: Has Curriculum Development Bypassed the 
controversies?” by Bruce Joyce, Marilyn Hrycauk, and Emily Calhoun, with the Northern 
Lights Kindergarten Teachers, Phi Delta Kappan, October 2003 (Vol. 85, #2, p. 126-132).

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

The Mifgashim List is a project of
The Lookstein Center for Jewish Education in the Diaspora,
The School of Education, Bar Ilan University

The Center encourages you to become a paid member and
benefit for the wide variety of programming offered by the Center.
For information see http://www.lookstein.org/joinus/.

To reply, comment or post a message, please write us at: [log in to unmask]
To leave the list, respond to this message with the word "remove" in the
subject line.

You can search the archives at http://listserv.biu.ac.il/archives/mifgashim.html.

Check out online educational materials and information on other
Lookstein Center programs on our website at http://www.lookstein.org/.

The e-community is supported by generous grants from Evelyn and Shmuel Katz, Bal Harbour, Fl.

Further information may be obtained by writing to: [log in to unmask]

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.BIU.AC.IL

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager