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MIFGASHIM  February 2011

MIFGASHIM February 2011

Subject:

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 160

From:

Rabbi Lee Buckman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 23 Feb 2011 04:08:35 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (210 lines)

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 160


Contents:

1.         Lookstein Center on Facebook

2.         Classmates Monitor Peers’ FB to minimize bullying

3.         More on Using Performance Tasks in Hebrew Language Classes

4.         Hebrew Language Practice Using Flip Cameras

5.         Marshall Memo: Effective Use of Comics in Hebrew Language Classrooms


~~~~~~~~~


1.         Lookstein Center on Facebook

"Like" The Lookstein Center on Facebook to see short updates on our
activities, resources, and "current events" in the Jewish education
world.
Either search "The Lookstein Center" or go directly to
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/The-Lookstein-Center/125499154148207.


~~~~~~~~~


2.         Classmates Monitor Peers’ FB to minimize bullying

Ha'aretz recently reported on a school where students started
monitoring their own classmates Facebook to prevent cyberbullying.
“Students at a Herzliya elementary school have joined forces to fight
bullying and other inappropriate behavior carried out via the Facebook
social networking application.

Fifth- and sixth-graders at the city's Alon school founded Facebook
Committee, whose members participate in what they term a "Facebook
Watch." The idea is that students who observe swearing, bullying,
harassment or inappropriate photographs posted on their classmates'
Facebook pages will contact those responsible and ask them to remove
the offensive postings. Uncooperative students will be reported to
their homeroom teacher.”

See the full-length version of the article at:
http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/students-set-up-facebook-watch-to-monitor-online-bullying-1.343434


~~~~~~~~~


3.         More on Using Performance Tasks in Hebrew Language Classes

Apropos of the recent Marshall Memo (Volume 8 Issue 159) on Hebrew
language assessment, those intereseted might consider following Scott
Goldberg's blog while he is at the DIBELS Summit.

http://www.yuschoolpartnership.org/teachers/hebrew-language/110-articles/128-is-hebrew-reading-relevant-to-general-educators

He is talking about his creation of MaDYK – Mivchan Dinami shel
Y’cholot Kriah which was piloted in 8 schools this year.


~~~~~~~~~


4.         Hebrew Language Practice Using Flip Cameras

In a report to the Avi Chai Foundation, Hebrew teachers from the
American Hebrew Academy describe their attempts to create authentic
(and non-threatening) settings for Hebrew language practice by making
use of flip cameras.

"The general pedagogical concept was to have students create scripts
in Hebrew, rehearse these short several minute pieces, to video them,
and then to display their video to their classmates. In doing so
student exercise their use of Hebrew, learn vocabulary, and speak in
public (but in small peer groups and on video – not just in front of a
class).

Over the course of the year a great deal of experimentation in the use
of student produced video was done by a number of highly experienced
Hebrew Language teachers. It was found that in the early efforts with
this new technology expectations from the hardware and the software
were unreasonable. The microphones were not sensitive enough to shoot
scenes from far away. The time and effort it takes to edit of video of
any length and complexity was a considerable barrier to learning. The
process was further stultified by the formality of the process and
success in the early efforts was limited. As a result teachers became
less interested in the effort.

Then, several teachers came to better understand how to incorporate
the little cameras into their instruction and modified their
pedagogical model. They accepted that video quality would be poor;
that videos wouldn’t be the beautiful somewhat lengthy movies they had
worked hard to prepare and edit in the past, but indeed would be
short, shaky, and look more like YouTube videos. Indeed, editing and
post-production became no priority at all.

At that point teachers saw success. They simplified the
post-production requirement. In the end movie length was limited to
two minutes. The kids became excited by being able to“play” movie
makers, and as they are with YouTube videos, fully appreciated the
informality of their products.

Teachers then were able to see that the lesson they were teaching was
NOT in the uses of video cameras, editing, and movie making. The
lesson was engagement with the learning the Hebrew Language and
indeed, students had fun, while learning and speaking Hebrew."

The includes three lessons that can be replicated
http://www.americanhebrewacademy.org/docs/Final%20Report-Video.pdf.


~~~~~~~~~


5.         Marshall Memo: Effective Use of Comics in Hebrew Language Classrooms

“There has never been a better time to be a language teacher,” say
Salisbury University professors Claire Kew and Arlene White in this
article in The Language Educator. They cite abundant, high-quality
curriculum materials in a variety of media and tout a resource that is
underused by many teachers, they say: comic books (a.k.a. graphic
novels).

They especially recommend the Tintin series (22 full-length adventures
available in 91 languages including Hebrew) and the Asterix series (33
adventures in more than 100 languages including Hebrew). Kew and White
suggest the following ways to use these and other high-quality comic
books:

• Developing and reinforcing communication skills – Students can work
in small groups to describe and answer questions on what’s happening
frame by frame, take the role of a character, detail the sequence of
events and cause and effect, and communicate with classmates in the
target language.

• Teaching vocabulary and grammar in context – Students at different
levels can answer questions on events, characters, and verb tenses.

• Teaching culture – “Comic books abound with cultural lessons waiting
to be explored,” say Kew and White, both about the countries in which
the adventures take place and European attitudes toward some of the
places Tintin and Asterix visit.

• Teaching history – Both the Tintin and the Asterix books can be used
to explore eras in history and the biases of the authors.

• Teaching geography – All but one of the Tintin books place the hero
and his friends in different parts of the world – Peru, Scotland,
Congo, Soviet Union, Tibet, the South Pacific, etc.

• Teaching reading strategies – The comic-book format, with
information coming in bite-size chunks with plenty of illustrations,
is less overwhelming to students and provides plenty of context clues.
The fermata – dramatic pauses at the end of each page in a comic-book
adventure – can be used to teach how an author chunks the story and
builds suspense.

• Introducing literary analysis – Comic adventures use the same
conventions as novels – exposition, rising action, climax, falling
action, and dénouement – and these can be used to introduce students
to these elements in novels. Comics are also rich in similes and
metaphors, onomatopoeia and symbolia, and character development.

• Providing fun and motivation and building students’ confidence –
Comics engage students and provide a welcome change of pace.

As a follow-up to reading graphic novels in another language, students
might create their own comics using websites Strip Generator –
http://www.stripgenerator.com – and Comic Creator –
http://www.readwritethink.org/MATERIALS/COMIC.


“Thinking Outside the Bubble by Adding Comic Books to Your Language
Curriculum” by Claire Kew and Arlene White in The Language Educator,
August 2009 (Vol. 4, #4, p. 49-53), no e-link available

The Marshall Memo is a weekly digest of important research in K-12
education. Individual
subscriptions are $50 for the school year at
http://www.marshallmemo.com.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

The Mifgashim List is a project of
The Lookstein Center for Jewish Education in the Diaspora,
The School of Education, Bar Ilan University

The Center encourages you to become a paid member and
benefit for the wide variety of programming offered by the Center.
For information see http://www.lookstein.org/joinus/.

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You can search the archives at http://listserv.biu.ac.il/archives/mifgashim.html.

Check out online educational materials and information on other
Lookstein Center programs on our website at http://www.lookstein.org/.

The e-community is supported by generous grants from Evelyn and Shmuel Katz, Bal Harbour, Fl.

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