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MIFGASHIM  June 2013

MIFGASHIM June 2013

Subject:

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 248

From:

Rabbi Lee Buckman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Thu, 13 Jun 2013 02:35:34 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (230 lines)

Mifgashim Volume 8 Issue 248


Contents:


1.	Blended learning and day school affordability

2.	Online summer school courses in Ivrit and Limudei Kodesh subjects

3.	HaYidion:  Call for Papers on Rising Ed Trends

4.	Marketing your school with video

5.	Marshall Memo:  How to Build Trust in Day Schools


~~~~~~~~~


1.	Blended learning and day school affordability

Russel Neiss, the Director of Educational Technology for G-dcast,
argues in the May 20, 2013 edition of ejewishphilanthropy that blended
or online learning will not solve the day school affordability
problem.

“Let’s ignore the question as to whether or not technology actually
helps student achievement (bottom line, it might, but there’s no real
evidence yet to prove that it does—
http://www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidence-based-practices/finalreport.pdf),
and instead focus on whether or not these allegedly new pedagogical
approaches cut the cost of education.

To date, there has not been one single large scale study showing any
significant cost savings of blended learning. The closest we have is a
single report by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute that suggests given
the right circumstances, blended learning can lower the cost of
instruction per pupil by an average of around $1,000 annually. The
real cost savings of using technology for instruction comes only with
a fully virtual school model, which drives the cost down about $4,000
per pupil on average….

So for technology to make any significant impact on the affordability
of a school, it means that somehow the technology needs to replace a
beloved member of the faculty or staff. Compared to a fully virtual
environment, blended learning only lets you get rid of a couple of
teachers (usually by increasing class sizes), and so the savings
remain limited….”

To see the full post, go to
http://ejewishphilanthropy.com/jewish-ed-tech-macher-says-tech-is-not-not-the-answer-to-affordability/?utm_source=Mon+May+20&utm_campaign=Mon+May+20&utm_medium=email


~~~~~~~~~


2.	Online summer school courses in Ivrit and Limudei Kodesh subjects	

Bonim B'Yachad a leading provider of online educational programs has
opened registration for its online summer school program.
The program offers fully accredited summer classes in both Judaic and
secular studies subjects. This program is ideal for students who need
to retake courses and also for students who are looking for enrichment
opportunities.

Summer sessions are also perfect for new transfer students who need to
increase their skill levels before the start of the new year.

· Live Classes set according to your schedule
· Courses can be set according to camp sessions
· Fully certified and experienced teachers
· SAT/ACT Prep Courses
· Special discounts available for Jewish day school or youth group students

For more information, or to register please contact us at
[log in to unmask] or 732-572-6575


~~~~~~~~~


3.	HaYidion:  Call for Papers on Rising Ed Trends


RAVSAK: The Jewish Community Day School Network seeks articles for the
fall issue of its quarterly journal HaYidion. The theme of the issue
is Rising Ed Trends. Articles should discuss a prominent movement in
education today--eg, STEM, STEAM, Common Core, Project-Based Learning,
etc.--with an eye to information that is relevant and actionable in
day schools. Article deadline: July 19.

Article topics are open to an area of your interest and research; they
must be relevant to Jewish day school education ages pre-K through
high school. Articles are typically 1000-2000 words, written in
non-academic style (no footnotes) and offering insight and suggestions
to educators. Adaptation of material previously published in academic
journals or elsewhere is acceptable. Articles promoting a particular
product or organization will not be published. If interested, contact
Elliott Rabin at [log in to unmask] Submit a brief description of
topic only, not a full article.

HaYidion: The RAVSAK Journal is published quarterly for distribution
to RAVSAK member schools and on a subscription basis. (Previous issues
can be accessed at www.ravsak.org/hayidion.) Each issue focuses on a
theme of importance to practitioners of Jewish education. The journal
publishes articles by a range of authors, including scholars, outside
experts, and leading educators in the field of Jewish day schools.
Articles provide guidance, information and inspiration to
administrators, teachers and lay leaders in Jewish day schools
worldwide.


Elliott Rabin, PhD
Director of Educational Programs
RAVSAK: The Jewish Community Day School Network
120 West 97th St.
New York, NY 10025
T: (212) 665-1320
F: (212) 665-1321
www.ravsak.org

~~~~~~~~~


4.	Marketing your school with video

Rick Newberry, an expert in marketing private schools, discusses the
use of video.
http://www.enrollmentcatalyst.com/2013/06/12/an-inspiring-and-creative-viral-video-to-market-a-school/?utm_source=Enrollment+Catalyst&utm_campaign=d82729c836-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_806d33acf8-d82729c836-323027897

He features a clever and inspiring three-minute video created by
Trinity School at Greenlawn in South Bend, IN.  The video and
Newberry’s blog are worth following.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laL9du84rac&utm_source=Enrollment+Catalyst&utm_campaign=d82729c836-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_806d33acf8-d82729c836-323027897

~~~~~~~~~


5.	Marshall Memo:  How to Build Trust in Day Schools
	
“Trust between principal and teachers, administrators and school
staffs, parents and staff, teachers and students, and among students
is essential for schools to improve,” says Valerie von Frank in this
Tools for Schools article. College of William and Mary professor Megan
Tschannen-Moran agrees: “Nontrust is debilitating. People are less
willing to share ideas and their energy is devoted to hypervigilance.
Communication shuts down.” A 2004 study of Chicago schools by Bryk and
Schneider found that schools with a high degree of relational trust as
they began a school improvement process had a one-in-two chance of
improving math and reading achievement, whereas schools with low
levels of trust had a one-in-seven chance of success.
	
But what exactly is trust? Here is Tschannen-Moran’s definition:
“Trust is an individual’s or group’s willingness to be vulnerable to
another party based on the confidence that the latter party is
benevolent, reliable, competent, honest, and open.”

These details on each criterion might form the core of a school survey:

• Benevolence – Confidence that one’s well-being or something one
cares about will be protected by the trusted party… the assurance that
others will not exploit one’s vulnerability or take advantage even
when the opportunity is available.

• Honesty – The trusted person’s character, integrity, and
authenticity… acceptance of responsibility for one’s actions and not
distorting the truth in order to shift blame to another.

• Openness – The extent to which relevant information is shared…
openness signals reciprocal trust.

• Reliability – Consistency of behavior and knowing what to expect
from others… a sense of confidence that one’s needs will be met in
positive ways.

• Competency – The ability to perform as expected and according to
standards appropriate to the task at hand.

Tschannen-Moran has a number of suggestions on how leaders can build
trust in a school, and suggests working with a coach to improve the
culture of the school. It all boils down to this: “Develop a
thoughtful leadership style. Act with humility. Treat teachers like
professionals.”

The specifics:
-	Be reflective about how you are using the five facets of trust. You
need all five.
-	Build relationships first. “Go slow to go fast,” she advises.
-	Trust teachers to make decisions and give them a voice in issues of
consequence.
-	Structure opportunities for lots of interpersonal interaction so
that teachers build relationships around meaningful work.
-	Develop a vision of what trust looks like, especially respect,
communication, and appreciation.
-	Really listen. “Teachers who feel they are being listened to begin
to shift the culture,” says Tschannen-Moran.
-	Emphasize cooperation and sharing versus competition and favoritism.

“Trust Matters – for Educators, Parents, and Students” by Valerie von
Frank in Tools for Schools, Fall 2010 (Vol. 14, #1, p. 1-3), no e-link
available
The Marshall Memo is a weekly digest of important research in K-12
education. Individual
subscriptions are $50 for the school year at
http://www.marshallmemo.com.

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

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The Lookstein Center for Jewish Education in the Diaspora,
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